Tuesday, December 25 2012, 04:30 PM
Responses (4)
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 28 2014, 07:36 AM - #permalink
    What motivates me to work for racial justice and unity is my own personal pain as an American Indian in the United States. In 2012 the United Nations investigated the United States for violations of human rights of Native Americans and their final found far too many violations of our human rights. This report has stimulated me to work even harder toward racial justice and unity. Starting with my own healing using the Baha'i Writings as a guide, I take one step at a time toward the ultimate goal of the unity of humankind.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Monday, October 07 2013, 02:45 AM - #permalink
    I'm not sure how to answer that question as I don't actually set out to work on race unity. I just set out to be nice to people and hope it works out. If it doesn't work out and I feel it's due to racism, I'll back off a bit and reassess the situation...the person. If after reassessing, I'm still uncertain about what the person meant by what they said or did and I think the relationship is worth pursuing, meaning I like the person well enough to really care about what they meant, I'll oftentimes find a way to ask them about it. I've found this to be the most effective approach for me. If my reassessment reveals to me that this person is a racist or just generally not a nice person, I would probably not deal with the person much anymore. I think it's important to pick your battles, trust your judgement as to who is worth pursuing and pray for the others. If this person I had chosen not to pursue kept showing up in my life for some reason, I would feel it was some how Gods will that I deal with him or her and I would no doubt broach the subject and hope for the best. If he or she just denied everything, I would, as gently as possible, let them know how their behavior affected me and request that they consider my feelings on the subject. This may not change them, but generally they will alter their behavior towards me.
    Sometimes all you can do is let people know. It reminds me of something Martin Luther King said and I think this is a paraphrase, but pretty close. "It may be true that the law can't change the heart, but it can restrain the heartless". In this case telling a person how he affects you may restrain him in the future.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Saturday, August 31 2013, 03:50 PM - #permalink
    Surely what motivates me is my parents' vision of the world they taught us by choosing a first home in a genuinely integrated neighborhood in Los Angeles in the 1960s. It was so good for me to be in the white minority early on.
    But I think it must be karmic, much older than that, this thirst for justice.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, August 30 2013, 08:39 AM - #permalink
    What motivates me is the Baha'i Faith! The Teachings of Baha'u'llah that all of humanity is one! "Ye are the fruits of One Tree, the leaves of one branch." And that this is the age of Justice and the coming together of mankind into one world civilization, in which we all share our knowledge.
    "The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice, " Baha'u'llah wrote. All of us have been put here on earth at this time to help this process.
    We moved into an all black Township and our children grew up with their black and white friends. And they spent time at Louhelen Baha'i School among people from all over the world .
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